Two rodeo riders with a passion for riding

Traditions passed down from generations

Belen Ward
bward@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 8/10/21

Beyond the history and the sport, two very different riders at very different events at the Adams County Fair shared one thing: tradition. The Professional Bull Riders (PBR) and the Charreada rodeos …

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Two rodeo riders with a passion for riding

Traditions passed down from generations

Posted

Beyond the history and the sport, two very different riders at very different events at the Adams County Fair shared one thing: tradition.

The Professional Bull Riders (PBR) and the Charreada rodeos bring to the Adams County Fair danger, excitement, toughness, and courage from two different types of cultures and family traditions.

Mason Ward, 20, from North Platte, Nebraska rides in the bucking bulls competition with the PBR Aug. 5. The tradition of riding bucking bulls started with his dad who rode professionally. Mason started his passion as a little boy bucking sheep and calves working his way to the bulls.

“The fact that you’re doing something that shouldn’t be done. I mean, there should be no reason why someone would be able to ride a 2,000-pound bull. The feeling when you ride, nothing in life matches to it,” said Mason. His family raises bulls so in his off-time Mason is busy taking care of the bulls. He continues to practice bucking on his bulls once a week. He runs every morning to keep in shape, build strength and flexibility.

Mason said his toughest bull was in the June college finals. “It had never been ridden and he was a tough one.”

Mason’s plans for the future are to make it to the PBR World Championship Finals and then retire.

Charreada is an art of Mexican horsemanship a tradition that has been passed down to cowboys and senoritas. Maximiliano Moralez ,21, grew up in the small town Cuautlia, Jalisco Mexico, and was one of the featured riders at the fair on Aug. 8.

Charreada is where he learned the sport of Charreada horsemanship and has been in competition for over 10-years.

Moralez’s Charro Team performs all over Colorado lassoing wild horses, and bulls. They also perform the Paso Del Muerte meaning step to death jumping from one horse to another with elegance and showmanship. Moralez’s Charro team is performing every weekend all over the state of Colorado to make it to the finals. Moralez future is to continuing performing with the Charro team and win competitions.

“I’m very passionate about the sport and dressing like a Charro,” Moralez said. “You feel like you are in another country, like in Mexico.”

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